Nutrition

At Kabobi Fresh Mediterranean we don’t stop at consistently delicious food. We want your choice to not only taste good, but to also be good for you! That’s why we produced this page to catalog some of the fine ingredients we use and prepare daily.

Kabobi Fresh Mediterranean stands by a pledge of always using fresh, non-GMO, and never frozen ingredients. Additionally, all orders are made with no preservatives or additives.

Our Trusted Ingredients

Saffron

Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world and has a strong perfume and a bitter, honey-like taste. The taste is pleasantly spicy and bitter and the odor is tenacious. Saffron also has a long history of use in traditional medicine.

Turmeric

Turmeric is one of those truly amazing plants that seem to do it all. In terms of taste it is one of those herbs that has a couple important tastes that gives a slight pungent and bitter overtone, adding a sophisticated taste to our dishes.

Garlic

Whole books have been written about garlic, an herb affectionately called “the stinking rose” in light of its numerous therapeutic benefits. Garlic is an excellent source of manganese, a very good source of vitamin B6 and vitamin C and a good source of selenium.

Cardamom

Cardamom is a spice native to the Middle East, North Africa, and Scandinavia. It has a strong, unique spicy-sweet taste, which is slightly aromatic and has been used for a variety of health benefits including being a detox.

Sumac

Sumac begins life as a berry, the fruit of a shrub that grows in dry, rocky places. The berries are dried and crushed to a deep, wine-red powder. With its fresh, sour-but-fruity flavour, sumac plays a similar role to lemon juice, but has the advantage of not being a liquid.

Mint leaves

Mint leaves are hardy, rapidly growing perennial plants native to Europe and Asia. Ancient Greeks and Romans used mint leaves to relieve pain, and mint has been used in natural medicine to alleviate indigestion for nearly as long. Modern scientific studies have uncovered a variety of potential health benefits for mint.

Parsley

A sprig of parsley can provide much more than a decoration on your plate. Parsley contains myristicin, limonene, eugenol, and alpha-thujene. Parsley also has flavonoids – apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol, and luteolin.

Lime & Lemons

Lemons and limes are an excellent source of one of the most important antioxidants in nature, vitamin C. Vitamin C is one of the main antioxidants found in food and the primary water-soluble antioxidant in the body.

Olive Oil

Pure, extra virgin olive oil is not only a light and delicate addition to many wonderful dishes, it is one of the most health-promoting types of oils available.

Garbanzo Beans

Garbanzos (also called chickpeas) are a good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber, as are most other beans. In addition to lowering cholesterol, garbanzos’ high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising too rapidly after a meal, making these beans an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia.

Olives

Olives are a very good source of monounsaturated fats and a good source of vitamin E. Because monounsaturated fats are less easily damaged than polyunsaturated fats, it’s good to have some in our cells’ outer membranes and other cell structures that contain fats, such as the membranes that surround the cell’s DNA and each of its energy-producing mitochondria.

Yogurt

Yogurt as a very good source of calcium, phosphorous, riboflavin-vitamin B2 and iodine. Yogurt also emerged as a good source of vitamin B12, pantothenic acid-vitamin B5, zinc, potassium, protein and molybdenum. These 10 nutrients alone would make yogurt a health-supportive food.

Persian Cucumber

The flesh of cucumbers is primarily composed of water but also contains ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and caffeic acid, both of which help soothe skin irritations and reduce swelling. Cucumbers’ hard skin is rich in fiber and contains a variety of beneficial minerals including silica, potassium and magnesium

Onions

Onions, like garlic, are members of the Allium family, and both are rich in powerful sulfur-containing compounds that are responsible for their pungent odors and for many of their health-promoting effects.

Eggplant

In addition to featuring a host of vitamins and minerals, eggplant also contains important phytonutrients, many which have antioxidant activity. Phytonutrients contained in eggplant include phenolic compounds, such caffeic and chlorogenic acid, and flavonoids, such as nasunin.

Tomato

In the area of food and phytonutrient research, nothing has been hotter in the last five years than studies on the lycopene in tomatoes. This carotenoid found in tomatoes (and everything made from them) has been extensively studied for its antioxidant and cancer-preventing properties.

Pomegranate

Pomegranate is one of the oldest known fruits, found in writings and artifacts of many cultures and religions. This nutrient dense, antioxidant rich fruit has been revered as a symbol of health, fertility and eternal life.

Walnuts

Walnuts are high in protein, vitamins, omega 3 fatty acids, trace minerals, lecithin and oils. Compared with other nuts, which typically contain a high amount of monounsaturated fats, walnuts are unique because the fats in them are primarily polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and are the only nut with a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid. Moreover, walnuts have insignificant amounts of sodium and are cholesterol free.

Chicken

Chicken is rated as a very good source of protein, providing 67.6% of the daily value for protein in 4 ounces. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We derive our amino acids from animal and plant sources of protein, then rearrange the nitrogen to make the pattern of amino acids we require.

Beef

Lately, red meat has been getting a lot of bad press. Studies have linked red meat to heart disease, atherosclerosis, and even some types of cancer. But while the greasy, charcoal-burned, bacon cheeseburger served with deep fried French fries is a bad idea, a nice bit of lean beef, added to stews, may actually be healthy for you.

contact us

(972) 803-5203

100 S Central Expy #49
Richardson, TX 75080

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opening times

Monday-Thursday
11am-10pm
Friday & Saturday
11am-10pm
Sunday
11am-10pm

more info

Free Wi-Fi
Outdoor Seating
Good for Groups
Wheelchair Accessible
Parking Private Lot
Accepts Apple Pay
Delivery & Take-out
Good for Kids
Waiter Service
Daily Lunch Buffet
Comfortable Seating
Takes Reservations